Work and life seperate for the Entrepreneur?

Work and life separate?

Thanks to Curt Rosengren at The Occupational Adventure (sm) Blog for tipping me off to the post: “Working For A Life” at buzz-attractor Worthwhile.

If this is true of the employee, this is doubly… triple… centuplilly (probably not even a word!) true for the entrepreneur.

It highlights the importance of building and running companies you believe in and feel good about… beyond just the profit involved. When you create something you BOTH profit from and believe in, the sense of regret or “wish I had been doing something else” I’ve seen present in a lot of folks over the years… fades away into a sense that you have created something greater than yourself. And it just feels good.

A side note: I’ve mentioned before that I get a lot of work done in my local Starbucks. When the baristas would ask me how I enjoy what I do, I’d say I love it. I don’t have to work a whole lot and still have a lifestyle I love. Over the course of a few months, they noticed I was working every day. And it wasn’t just at Starbucks. I’d often talk about the things I was doing when I got back to my office. One day they finally asked: “You say you don’t work a lot, but I see you in here working all the time. You are always talking about working when you are away from here. As far as I can tell, you don’t take any time off. What gives?” It finally dawned on me that because I love what I’m doing, I’m involved in it all the time, yet because I don’t think of it as work… it never occured to me to talk about it that way. That’s a Good Thing.

{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Anonymous April 14, 2004 at 3:04 pm

Working for a Life
Worthwhile:First of all, people can no longer (if they ever could) separate out their work and their ‘life.’ Work is such a central part of who we are—and consumes so much of our energy, spirit, time—that…
——-

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2 Anonymous April 14, 2004 at 8:04 pm

Working for a Life
Worthwhile:First of all, people can no longer (if they ever could) separate out their work and their ‘life.’ Work is such a central part of who we are—and consumes so much of our energy, spirit, time—that…——-

Reply

3 Anonymous April 14, 2004 at 10:04 am

Avi,

Haven’t found one who has those aspirations… yet.

Most have drank the ‘ole Starbucks Kool-Aid and are looking to move up… or move on to some other, non-entrepreneurial, love.

Michael

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4 Anonymous April 14, 2004 at 3:04 pm

Avi,
Haven’t found one who has those aspirations… yet.
Most have drank the ‘ole Starbucks Kool-Aid and are looking to move up… or move on to some other, non-entrepreneurial, love.
Michael

Reply

5 Anonymous April 13, 2004 at 6:04 pm

Hey, maybe you could interview one of the Starbucks Baristas as to their entrepreneurial aspirations?
Cheers,
Avi

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6 Anonymous April 13, 2004 at 11:04 pm

Hey, maybe you could interview one of the Starbucks Baristas as to their entrepreneurial aspirations?
Cheers,
Avi

Reply

7 Anonymous April 12, 2004 at 5:04 pm

An entrepreneur once told a group I was in: ‘Work is just an excuse to hang out with peopel; that’s why so many of us are entrepreneurs.’  It’s an opportunity to work for someone you respect and to choose your colleagues.  Significant freedom, indeed.

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8 Anonymous April 12, 2004 at 10:04 pm

An entrepreneur once told a group I was in: ‘Work is just an excuse to hang out with peopel; that’s why so many of us are entrepreneurs.’  It’s an opportunity to work for someone you respect and to choose your colleagues.  Significant freedom, indeed.

Reply

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