What’s the difference between Sales and Marketing?

I’ve been asked twice this week what the difference between sales and marketing is. Might as well answer it here…

People get hung up on this an awful lot. It really isn’t rocket science. It doesn’t need fancy words or esoteric concepts.

Marketing is everything you do to get and leverage a client relationship.

Sales is a one-on-one, non-automated (this caveat is necessary with “one-to-one marketing” being a popular buzz-concept) aspect of marketing.

Anti-climactic? Maybe…

When a business considers sales and marketing to be two entirely different aspects/roles/divisions, very bad things happen. Sales teams that are not integrated and a function of the marketing strategy are doomed to mind-numbing cold calls and other wastes of time and effort. Most big, dumb companies fit squarely into this category.

A tightly integrated marketing to sales process, on the other hand, is an enormous advantage. It is much more common at small businesses and medium sized businesses that have maintained their entrepreneurial nature, usually because the founder who originally had to do BOTH roles and, on some level, understands their proper relationship is still around.

{ 74 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Amit Kumar Kesharwani October 21, 2012 at 2:35 pm

we can say Marketing is the is the father of the Sales. Sales is the son of the Marketing

Reply

2 RAMESH CHANDRA BLODI May 8, 2012 at 6:59 am

Marketing and sales both are the important activities for every organization. Marketing is a broader term than sales. It consist public relations, branding, advertising, sales etc. Hence sales is the one part or activity of the marketing. Marketing is not related with the closing the sale. When you interacting with the consumer and closing the sale then it is called sales.

Marketing is creating the demand in the market while sales is fulfilling that demand. Marketing is more related with branding while sales is related with one on one marketing. For example, when you do all activities to reach mass audiences and consumer to create demand than you are doing marketing and when you are reaching with your prospects one by one via direct calls than your doing sales. It mean sales is a direct activity while marketing is indirect activity.

In small firms usually marketing and sales both are handled by the same department while in big firms or organizations there are different departments for both the activities.
Marketing creates a brand image of the product or service while sales is only related with selling the product or service. Both the activities are interrelated at the some point of the time. When a person is doing marketing than he doing sales on a large scale while when a person selling than at the same time he is doing marketing.

Without marketing you can not sale the product or service. Therefore marketing is more important than sales.

There is one more important difference between marketing and sales and that is the focus. Marketing focuses on long term concerns while sales is related with short term focus.
Marketing is related with educating and creating awareness of the product or service in the market. Sales is also related with educating and creating awareness but the difference is scale marketing do these activities on a huge scale while sales does these activities on very short scale and most of the times one on one basis. Sales is more related with interpersonal and interaction with prospects.
(DEGHAT DUBASIL BY; (RAMESH CHANDRA BLODI

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3 sanu November 29, 2011 at 9:20 am

Marketing and sales
We can define marketing as the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.

Marketing is a wider terms and inside its comes, Production,Promotion, Sales,
Distribution etc. Lets say if marketing is a Tree Sales is it branches.

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4 Ali Raza May 31, 2010 at 4:00 pm

Hello
Differentiate between sales man and marketer.
is any one can send me his comments.?

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5 Kerem Comoglu May 19, 2011 at 6:05 am

A Marketer’s main role is to empathize and put himself on prospects’ or customers’ side. (Positioning, promotion, price, packing, distribution, design and etc. wise)
A Salesman’s main focus is reaching the targets, achieving to numbers and growing the sales those which can not be succeed by empathizing but mainly focusing on your ‘own’ goals.

Reply

6 ahfl June 5, 2009 at 5:58 pm

marketing is marketing

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7 sm hidayat January 27, 2009 at 1:32 pm

i m looking to sales as well as admin n marketing of polyurethne spray faom.
i want to extend my sales marketing skills.
pls let me know
i will be greatful to you if u send me free CD to me.abour ur site which is best to learn.
thanks/

sm hidayat
s.f unit 12 hub river road site karachi pakistan
tel 92-21-2571982

Reply

8 sm hidayat January 27, 2009 at 1:32 pm

i m looking to sales as well as admin n marketing of polyurethne spray faom.
i want to extend my sales marketing skills.
pls let me know
i will be greatful to you if u send me free CD to me.abour ur site which is best to learn.
thanks/

sm hidayat
s.f unit 12 hub river road site karachi pakistan
tel 92-21-2571982

Reply

9 sm hidayat January 27, 2009 at 1:32 pm

i m looking to sales as well as admin n marketing of polyurethne spray faom.
i want to extend my sales marketing skills.
pls let me know
i will be greatful to you if u send me free CD to me.abour ur site which is best to learn.
thanks/

sm hidayat
s.f unit 12 hub river road site karachi pakistan
tel 92-21-2571982

Reply

10 sm hidayat January 27, 2009 at 1:32 pm

i m looking to sales as well as admin n marketing of polyurethne spray faom.
i want to extend my sales marketing skills.
pls let me know
i will be greatful to you if u send me free CD to me.abour ur site which is best to learn.
thanks/

sm hidayat
s.f unit 12 hub river road site karachi pakistan
tel 92-21-2571982

Reply

11 Anonymous August 16, 2008 at 10:37 pm

at the end, marketing is creating a need, selling is fulfilling that need.
HB

Reply

12 Anonymous August 17, 2008 at 3:37 am

at the end, marketing is creating a need, selling is fulfilling that need.
HB

Reply

13 Anonymous April 22, 2008 at 10:50 am

Many people mistakenly think that selling and marketing are the same – they aren’t. You might already know that the marketing process is broad and includes all of the following:

Discovering what product, service or idea customers want.
Producing a product with the appropriate features and quality.
Pricing the product correctly.
Promoting the product; spreading the word about why customers should buy it.
Selling and delivering the product into the hands of the customer.
Selling is one activity of the entire marketing process.

Selling is the act of persuading or influencing a customer to buy (actually exchange something of value for) a product or service.

Marketing activities support sales efforts. Actually, they are usually the most significant force in stimulating sales. Oftentimes, marketing activities (like the production of marketing materials and catchy packaging) must occur before a sale can be made; they sometimes follow the sale as well, to pave the way for future sales and referrals.

Contrasting the Sales Concept with the Marketing Concept
The concepts surrounding both selling and marketing also differ. There is a need for both selling and marketing approaches in different situations. One approach is not always right and the other always wrong – it depends upon the particular situation.

In a marketing approach, more listening to and eventual accommodation of the target market occurs. Two-way communication (sometimes between a salesperson and a customer) is emphasized in marketing so learning can take place and product offerings can be improved.

A salesperson using the sales concept, on the other hand, sometimes has the ability to individualize components of a sale, but the emphasis is ordinarily upon helping the customer determine if they want the product, or a variation on it, that is already being offered by the company. In the sales approach, not much time is spent learning what the customer’s ideal product would be because the salesperson has little say in seeing that their company’s product is modified. Furthermore, they aren’t rewarded for spending time listening to the customer’s desires unless they have a product to match their desires that will result in a sale. (Note, however, that sales people aren’t restricted to the use of the sales concept; oftentimes they use the marketing concept instead.)

At the heart of the sales concept is the desire to sell a product that the business has made as quickly as possible to fulfill sales volume objectives. When viewed through the marketing concept lens, however, businesses must first and foremost fulfill consumers’ wants and needs. The belief is that when those wants and needs are fulfilled, a profit will be made.

Do you see the difference? The selling concept, instead of focusing on meeting consumer demand, tries to make consumer demand match the products it has produced. Whereas marketing encompasses many research and promotional activities to discover what products are wanted and to make potential customers aware of them.

Reply

14 Anonymous April 22, 2008 at 3:50 pm

Many people mistakenly think that selling and marketing are the same – they aren’t. You might already know that the marketing process is broad and includes all of the following:
Discovering what product, service or idea customers want.
Producing a product with the appropriate features and quality.
Pricing the product correctly.
Promoting the product; spreading the word about why customers should buy it.
Selling and delivering the product into the hands of the customer.
Selling is one activity of the entire marketing process.
Selling is the act of persuading or influencing a customer to buy (actually exchange something of value for) a product or service.
Marketing activities support sales efforts. Actually, they are usually the most significant force in stimulating sales. Oftentimes, marketing activities (like the production of marketing materials and catchy packaging) must occur before a sale can be made; they sometimes follow the sale as well, to pave the way for future sales and referrals.
Contrasting the Sales Concept with the Marketing Concept
The concepts surrounding both selling and marketing also differ. There is a need for both selling and marketing approaches in different situations. One approach is not always right and the other always wrong – it depends upon the particular situation.
In a marketing approach, more listening to and eventual accommodation of the target market occurs. Two-way communication (sometimes between a salesperson and a customer) is emphasized in marketing so learning can take place and product offerings can be improved.
A salesperson using the sales concept, on the other hand, sometimes has the ability to individualize components of a sale, but the emphasis is ordinarily upon helping the customer determine if they want the product, or a variation on it, that is already being offered by the company. In the sales approach, not much time is spent learning what the customer’s ideal product would be because the salesperson has little say in seeing that their company’s product is modified. Furthermore, they aren’t rewarded for spending time listening to the customer’s desires unless they have a product to match their desires that will result in a sale. (Note, however, that sales people aren’t restricted to the use of the sales concept; oftentimes they use the marketing concept instead.)
At the heart of the sales concept is the desire to sell a product that the business has made as quickly as possible to fulfill sales volume objectives. When viewed through the marketing concept lens, however, businesses must first and foremost fulfill consumers’ wants and needs. The belief is that when those wants and needs are fulfilled, a profit will be made.
Do you see the difference? The selling concept, instead of focusing on meeting consumer demand, tries to make consumer demand match the products it has produced. Whereas marketing encompasses many research and promotional activities to discover what products are wanted and to make potential customers aware of them.

Reply

15 Anonymous February 7, 2008 at 12:45 pm

marking is all about know the needs and wants of ur customers and fulfilling them..
          where as sale is a one to one interaction between the buyer n seller for the exchange of some value..

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16 Anonymous February 7, 2008 at 5:45 pm

marking is all about know the needs and wants of ur customers and fulfilling them..
          where as sale is a one to one interaction between the buyer n seller for the exchange of some value..

Reply

17 Anonymous November 29, 2007 at 7:00 am

the differense betwen need and want in marketing

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18 Anonymous November 29, 2007 at 2:00 am

the differense betwen need and want in marketing

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19 Anonymous August 8, 2007 at 4:54 pm

The gross difference between sales and marketing arise as because people have a misconception that, “the art of selling” is called marketing.Selling is just a pinch to the marketing iceberg.

According to Peter.F.Ducker …….
Marketing makes the sale superfluous. The main aim of marketing is to understand the need and want of the customer so well that, the product or service fits him/her and sells itself.

But, if we talk about sale it is a monotonous
activity done in between two or more that two parties with their due consent for the exchange of some value. In the lay-man language it is known as “giving something and getting something”

For instance, McDonald understand the need and wans of the Indian customer. So, it decided to provide its burger without beef and pork.And gave an Indianize touch to its burger by naming it BIG ALU TIKI etall and also serving it with tamarind n chilly sauce.But, when a customer step in to any franchisee retail outlet of the McDonald, the franchisee only sells the burger as per the McDonald Inc. norms for India for the sake of money.Hence, in this context the McDonald   Inc. understand the palate of Indian customers (which is known as “Marketing”) to ease down the selling process in India.

Regards from,
Shubhendu Shekhar Mohapatra
MBA Student

Reply

20 Anonymous August 8, 2007 at 9:54 pm

The gross difference between sales and marketing arise as because people have a misconception that, “the art of selling” is called marketing.Selling is just a pinch to the marketing iceberg.
According to Peter.F.Ducker …….
Marketing makes the sale superfluous. The main aim of marketing is to understand the need and want of the customer so well that, the product or service fits him/her and sells itself.
But, if we talk about sale it is a monotonous
activity done in between two or more that two parties with their due consent for the exchange of some value. In the lay-man language it is known as “giving something and getting something”
For instance, McDonald understand the need and wans of the Indian customer. So, it decided to provide its burger without beef and pork.And gave an Indianize touch to its burger by naming it BIG ALU TIKI etall and also serving it with tamarind n chilly sauce.But, when a customer step in to any franchisee retail outlet of the McDonald, the franchisee only sells the burger as per the McDonald Inc. norms for India for the sake of money.Hence, in this context the McDonald   Inc. understand the palate of Indian customers (which is known as “Marketing”) to ease down the selling process in India.
Regards from,
Shubhendu Shekhar Mohapatra
MBA Student

Reply

21 Anonymous August 8, 2007 at 9:54 pm

The gross difference between sales and marketing arise as because people have a misconception that, “the art of selling” is called marketing.Selling is just a pinch to the marketing iceberg.
According to Peter.F.Ducker …….
Marketing makes the sale superfluous. The main aim of marketing is to understand the need and want of the customer so well that, the product or service fits him/her and sells itself.
But, if we talk about sale it is a monotonous
activity done in between two or more that two parties with their due consent for the exchange of some value. In the lay-man language it is known as “giving something and getting something”
For instance, McDonald understand the need and wans of the Indian customer. So, it decided to provide its burger without beef and pork.And gave an Indianize touch to its burger by naming it BIG ALU TIKI etall and also serving it with tamarind n chilly sauce.But, when a customer step in to any franchisee retail outlet of the McDonald, the franchisee only sells the burger as per the McDonald Inc. norms for India for the sake of money.Hence, in this context the McDonald   Inc. understand the palate of Indian customers (which is known as “Marketing”) to ease down the selling process in India.
Regards from,
Shubhendu Shekhar Mohapatra
MBA Student

Reply

22 Anonymous August 7, 2007 at 8:31 pm

Marketing is Like full body and Sales in One Hand

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23 Anonymous August 8, 2007 at 1:31 am

Marketing is Like full body and Sales in One Hand

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24 Anonymous August 8, 2007 at 1:31 am

Marketing is Like full body and Sales in One Hand

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25 Anonymous August 8, 2007 at 1:31 am

Marketing is Like full body and Sales in One Hand

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26 Anonymous August 8, 2007 at 1:31 am

Marketing is Like full body and Sales in One Hand

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27 Anonymous September 16, 2006 at 5:28 am

i think,
      u all have given the right difinations of marketin and sales.
u all r able to have thankx.

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28 Anonymous December 22, 2005 at 4:12 am

Marketing is standing atop a hill and seeing where all the potentials are and what is their current needs.

Sales is going where the action is and that’s miggle with the potentials at the hill side and closing the deal.
——-

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29 Anonymous December 22, 2005 at 9:12 am

Marketing is standing atop a hill and seeing where all the potentials are and what is their current needs.
Sales is going where the action is and that’s miggle with the potentials at the hill side and closing the deal.——-

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30 Anonymous October 5, 2005 at 6:10 am

Marketing is the search for the customer to match your product or services.
Sales takes part where the product or services matched with the customer needs.

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31 Anonymous October 5, 2005 at 11:10 am

Marketing is the search for the customer to match your product or services.
Sales takes part where the product or services matched with the customer needs.

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32 Anonymous October 5, 2005 at 11:10 am

Marketing is the search for the customer to match your product or services.
Sales takes part where the product or services matched with the customer needs.

Reply

33 Anonymous October 5, 2005 at 11:10 am

Marketing is the search for the customer to match your product or services.
Sales takes part where the product or services matched with the customer needs.

Reply

34 Anonymous September 25, 2005 at 7:09 am

Marketing is the effort of mainly creating and finding the needs and wants of the consumers and then to satisfy those needs…But,sales is only a part of marketing which aims towards making the products being in the customers hands.

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35 Anonymous September 25, 2005 at 12:09 pm

Marketing is the effort of mainly creating and finding the needs and wants of the consumers and then to satisfy those needs…But,sales is only a part of marketing which aims towards making the products being in the customers hands.

Reply

36 Anonymous September 25, 2005 at 12:09 pm

Marketing is the effort of mainly creating and finding the needs and wants of the consumers and then to satisfy those needs…But,sales is only a part of marketing which aims towards making the products being in the customers hands.

Reply

37 Anonymous September 25, 2005 at 12:09 pm

Marketing is the effort of mainly creating and finding the needs and wants of the consumers and then to satisfy those needs…But,sales is only a part of marketing which aims towards making the products being in the customers hands.

Reply

38 Anonymous September 25, 2005 at 12:09 pm

Marketing is the effort of mainly creating and finding the needs and wants of the consumers and then to satisfy those needs…But,sales is only a part of marketing which aims towards making the products being in the customers hands.

Reply

39 Anonymous September 21, 2005 at 12:09 pm

realy its good service frm u for us .it helps us to learn abt the subject in deep apart frm book thank u

Reply

40 Anonymous September 21, 2005 at 5:09 pm

realy its good service frm u for us .it helps us to learn abt the subject in deep apart frm book thank u

Reply

41 Anonymous September 21, 2005 at 5:09 pm

realy its good service frm u for us .it helps us to learn abt the subject in deep apart frm book thank u

Reply

42 Anonymous September 21, 2005 at 5:09 pm

realy its good service frm u for us .it helps us to learn abt the subject in deep apart frm book thank u

Reply

43 Anonymous September 21, 2005 at 5:09 pm

realy its good service frm u for us .it helps us to learn abt the subject in deep apart frm book thank u

Reply

44 Anonymous September 16, 2005 at 6:09 am

Marketing is a platform on which sales are driven,combing to reap profits for the organisation.

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45 Anonymous September 16, 2005 at 11:09 am

Marketing is a platform on which sales are driven,combing to reap profits for the organisation.

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46 Anonymous September 16, 2005 at 11:09 am

Marketing is a platform on which sales are driven,combing to reap profits for the organisation.

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47 Anonymous August 3, 2005 at 6:08 am

The Marketing department designs, develops, and support the sales to move from one stage to another within the sales cycle:Cold – warm – Hot.
It requires the efforts of both departments to close a deal.

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48 Anonymous August 3, 2005 at 11:08 am

The Marketing department designs, develops, and support the sales to move from one stage to another within the sales cycle:Cold – warm – Hot.
It requires the efforts of both departments to close a deal.

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49 Anonymous June 17, 2005 at 5:06 pm

Marketing is a circular process where sales is a part of it .Marketing is Knowing the need of the client and can be said as customer based process.where as sales is a company based process where the end result is geting money from client for the product.

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50 Anonymous June 17, 2005 at 10:06 pm

Marketing is a circular process where sales is a part of it .Marketing is Knowing the need of the client and can be said as customer based process.where as sales is a company based process where the end result is geting money from client for the product.

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51 Anonymous January 15, 2005 at 6:01 am

MaRKETING IS AN OVERALL DESECION OF ORGANISATION BUT SALES IS ONLY SELF HARDWORK.

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52 Anonymous January 15, 2005 at 11:01 am

MaRKETING IS AN OVERALL DESECION OF ORGANISATION BUT SALES IS ONLY SELF HARDWORK.

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53 Anonymous January 5, 2005 at 2:01 am

Marketing’s view is 30,000 feet, Sales’s is 3 feet.

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54 Anonymous January 5, 2005 at 7:01 am

Marketing’s view is 30,000 feet, Sales’s is 3 feet.

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55 Anonymous January 5, 2005 at 7:01 am

Marketing’s view is 30,000 feet, Sales’s is 3 feet.

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56 Anonymous December 12, 2004 at 5:12 am

Hi im 18yrs old,and recently started up my own business, this question seems to arise a great deal within my organisastion, so answer the question simpley:
Sales- Should should asses and choose sales strategy(eg solution sellingetc etc through aid of SWOT)
Marketing-target the potential customers who come under the chosen sales strategy)

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57 Anonymous September 3, 2004 at 9:09 pm

Sales is moving what you have. Marketing, having what you can move.

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58 Anonymous September 4, 2004 at 2:09 am

Sales is moving what you have. Marketing, having what you can move.

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59 Anonymous September 4, 2004 at 2:09 am

Sales is moving what you have. Marketing, having what you can move.

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60 Anonymous July 2, 2004 at 1:07 pm

“Marketing creates the platform…Sales asks for the order”

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61 Anonymous July 2, 2004 at 6:07 pm

“Marketing creates the platform…Sales asks for the order”

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62 Anonymous July 2, 2004 at 6:07 pm

“Marketing creates the platform…Sales asks for the order”

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63 Anonymous July 2, 2004 at 6:07 pm

“Marketing creates the platform…Sales asks for the order”

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64 Anonymous June 17, 2004 at 9:06 pm

It’s funny because I’m continually asked or debated as to whether sales is a function of marketing or vice-versa. I wholly believe that sales is a marketing function. And yet, so many companies I’ve seen actually subjugate their marketing people and functions to a “Senior Vice-President of Sales” or “Director of Sales”…who generally knows and cares little about the complete practice of marketing.

That’s a very frustrating and repressive environment for a marketer.

Reply

65 Anonymous June 18, 2004 at 2:06 am

It’s funny because I’m continually asked or debated as to whether sales is a function of marketing or vice-versa. I wholly believe that sales is a marketing function. And yet, so many companies I’ve seen actually subjugate their marketing people and functions to a “Senior Vice-President of Sales” or “Director of Sales”…who generally knows and cares little about the complete practice of marketing.
That’s a very frustrating and repressive environment for a marketer.

Reply

66 Anonymous June 18, 2004 at 2:06 am

It’s funny because I’m continually asked or debated as to whether sales is a function of marketing or vice-versa. I wholly believe that sales is a marketing function. And yet, so many companies I’ve seen actually subjugate their marketing people and functions to a “Senior Vice-President of Sales” or “Director of Sales”…who generally knows and cares little about the complete practice of marketing.
That’s a very frustrating and repressive environment for a marketer.

Reply

67 Anonymous June 16, 2004 at 4:06 am

I largely agree.

There is one aspect of Marketing, however, that I don’t see discussed as much as I believe it should be.

Marketing typically has the responsibility for determining the offers that the company will make.  By offer, I mean the physical product or service, and all of the other stuff that goes along with it, such as the terms of the sale, the warranty, customer service, etc.

There are good ways and bad ways to execute this process.  A bad way, in my experience, is to try to compete feature-for-feature with a competitor’s product.  Often, there’s a feature comparison sheet of some kind, and the implied goal of being able to put a check mark in the column corresponding to the company’s product.  To me, this feels like playing for a tie.  I’d rather play for a win.

A better way, in my experience, is to really understand the customer’s business, so that you can determine what you need to provide, no more and no less, that will significantly improve the customer’s operating results.  How do you really understand the customer’s business?  You have to build the cause-effect relationships for yourself.  If you choose to skip this step you’ll never understand their business well enough to identify a deep problem that your product or service can affect.

And yes, once you have done all of this, then Marketing has to plan and execute the campaigns, but to my mind, doing this initial work properly is absolutely critical to having a thriving company.

Reply

68 Anonymous June 16, 2004 at 9:06 am

I largely agree.
There is one aspect of Marketing, however, that I don’t see discussed as much as I believe it should be.
Marketing typically has the responsibility for determining the offers that the company will make.  By offer, I mean the physical product or service, and all of the other stuff that goes along with it, such as the terms of the sale, the warranty, customer service, etc.
There are good ways and bad ways to execute this process.  A bad way, in my experience, is to try to compete feature-for-feature with a competitor’s product.  Often, there’s a feature comparison sheet of some kind, and the implied goal of being able to put a check mark in the column corresponding to the company’s product.  To me, this feels like playing for a tie.  I’d rather play for a win.
A better way, in my experience, is to really understand the customer’s business, so that you can determine what you need to provide, no more and no less, that will significantly improve the customer’s operating results.  How do you really understand the customer’s business?  You have to build the cause-effect relationships for yourself.  If you choose to skip this step you’ll never understand their business well enough to identify a deep problem that your product or service can affect.
And yes, once you have done all of this, then Marketing has to plan and execute the campaigns, but to my mind, doing this initial work properly is absolutely critical to having a thriving company.

Reply

69 Anonymous June 16, 2004 at 9:06 am

I largely agree.
There is one aspect of Marketing, however, that I don’t see discussed as much as I believe it should be.
Marketing typically has the responsibility for determining the offers that the company will make.  By offer, I mean the physical product or service, and all of the other stuff that goes along with it, such as the terms of the sale, the warranty, customer service, etc.
There are good ways and bad ways to execute this process.  A bad way, in my experience, is to try to compete feature-for-feature with a competitor’s product.  Often, there’s a feature comparison sheet of some kind, and the implied goal of being able to put a check mark in the column corresponding to the company’s product.  To me, this feels like playing for a tie.  I’d rather play for a win.
A better way, in my experience, is to really understand the customer’s business, so that you can determine what you need to provide, no more and no less, that will significantly improve the customer’s operating results.  How do you really understand the customer’s business?  You have to build the cause-effect relationships for yourself.  If you choose to skip this step you’ll never understand their business well enough to identify a deep problem that your product or service can affect.
And yes, once you have done all of this, then Marketing has to plan and execute the campaigns, but to my mind, doing this initial work properly is absolutely critical to having a thriving company.

Reply

70 Anonymous June 16, 2004 at 9:06 am

I largely agree.
There is one aspect of Marketing, however, that I don’t see discussed as much as I believe it should be.
Marketing typically has the responsibility for determining the offers that the company will make.  By offer, I mean the physical product or service, and all of the other stuff that goes along with it, such as the terms of the sale, the warranty, customer service, etc.
There are good ways and bad ways to execute this process.  A bad way, in my experience, is to try to compete feature-for-feature with a competitor’s product.  Often, there’s a feature comparison sheet of some kind, and the implied goal of being able to put a check mark in the column corresponding to the company’s product.  To me, this feels like playing for a tie.  I’d rather play for a win.
A better way, in my experience, is to really understand the customer’s business, so that you can determine what you need to provide, no more and no less, that will significantly improve the customer’s operating results.  How do you really understand the customer’s business?  You have to build the cause-effect relationships for yourself.  If you choose to skip this step you’ll never understand their business well enough to identify a deep problem that your product or service can affect.
And yes, once you have done all of this, then Marketing has to plan and execute the campaigns, but to my mind, doing this initial work properly is absolutely critical to having a thriving company.

Reply

71 vijay kannan February 28, 2011 at 5:03 am

In marketing means to see the customer needs and do some survay about the product.

Sales directly to go customer place and sold okava

Reply

72 Amir Khan March 27, 2011 at 12:46 am

# Discovering what product, service or idea customers want.
# Producing a product with the appropriate features and quality.
# Pricing the product correctly.
# Promoting the product; spreading the word about why customers should buy it.
# Selling and delivering the product into the hands of the customer.
Selling is one activity of the entire marketing process.

Selling is the act of persuading or influencing a customer to buy (actually exchange something of value for) a product or service.

Marketing activities support sales efforts. Actually, they are usually the most significant force in stimulating sales. Oftentimes, marketing activities (like the production of marketing materials and catchy packaging) must occur before a sale can be made; they sometimes follow the sale as well, to pave the way for future sales and referrals.
marketing involves introducing the the right product which
meets the need of target customers. pricing the product
appropriately as per the budget flexibility of target
market.then promotion the product through choosing the
right communication strategy.and then reach the product to
the customer to buy it.

but sales is efforts to influence the the customer to get
the product bought.
Marketing Is One Of the advertisement But Sales is one of
art.
Marketing is the
process and sales is the activity.

Reply

73 paramesh July 20, 2011 at 11:32 pm

marketing is investigating and knowing the customer needs

sales means selling the product to the customer

Reply

74 Rakesh kumar sah July 22, 2011 at 7:16 am

The main thing of marketing is to search need, want & desire of the customers. exchange of ideas, distribution of services.

The sales is a assumption, in which to sell the products to customers by persuading, convincing and discussing about the satisfaction from the products being marketed.

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