Dreamers, Crazies, Entrepreneurs

Last week, I spent back-to-back consulting days with two different successful entrepreneurs. They had only fourth things in common.

  • They both had thriving companies making between $25 and 40 million dollars per year.
  • They had the good sense to bring me in to consult on their marketing.
  • They had both gone through extreme financial hardships at different points along their journey to enjoy the rewards they now have.
  • While their businesses were getting off the ground, both had friends, family, and colleagues tell them they were foolish, dreamers, and just flat-out crazy to be doing what they were doing.

Several years ago I sat in a seminar with one of my mentors, Dan Kennedy.

Dan, with over 200 people in the room, went through a line of questions: How many of you have filed bankruptcy? How many have had a car repossessed? How many have fought with collection agencies? And others along the same line. In a room full of successful entrepreneurs, with questions asked that most would squirm and run from, more than 3/4 of the hands were raised.

Jim Rohn is fond of saying becoming a millionaire is nothing compared to the real prize of who you must become in the process.

The journey of the entrepreneur is a hero’s journey. Those who take it face the pain and tragedy and ugliness with a smirk that says, “bwahaha, is that the best you’ve got?” It lets them understand something deep in their bones about themselves and the world that those who turn their back on their destiny can never comprehend.

Wherever you are today is where you are meant to be.
All that matters is what’s next.

Last year, Barry Moltz was kind enough to send me a copy of his book, “You Need to Be a Little Crazy.” I enjoyed the book, and I treasure the inscription.

“Michael, Stay crazy. Barry.”

It’s as good an entrepreneur’s mantra as any.

Stay crazy, friends.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Anonymous November 22, 2005 at 3:11 pm

Very inspiring, and true.  I strongly believe that is is our experiences in life that fine tune us into becoming who we are, and with each new challenge we learn and become better people… better entrepreneurs.

I’m in my twenties.  There are many times where I’ve succumbed to the trials and wonder if I should go out and get a job.  Then I realize that getting a job is a quick exit strategy.  To do so would be to give up on something much bigger.

So I freely struggle as an entrepreneur, to build my life and aspire to achieve something greater.

JP

Reply

2 Anonymous November 22, 2005 at 8:11 pm

Very inspiring, and true.  I strongly believe that is is our experiences in life that fine tune us into becoming who we are, and with each new challenge we learn and become better people… better entrepreneurs.
I’m in my twenties.  There are many times where I’ve succumbed to the trials and wonder if I should go out and get a job.  Then I realize that getting a job is a quick exit strategy.  To do so would be to give up on something much bigger.
So I freely struggle as an entrepreneur, to build my life and aspire to achieve something greater.

JP

Reply

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